Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World

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Penguin, 1. júl. 1998 - 304 síđur
39 Gagnrýni
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An unexpected, energetic look at world history via the humble cod fish from the bestselling author of Salt and The Basque History of the World

Cod
,
Mark Kurlansky’s third work of nonfiction and winner of the 1999 James Beard Award, is the biography of a single species of fish, but it may as well be a world history with this humble fish as its recurring main character. Cod, it turns out, is the reason Europeans set sail across the Atlantic, and it is the only reason they could. What did the Vikings eat in icy Greenland and on the five expeditions to America recorded in the Icelandic sagas? Cod, frozen and dried in the frosty air, then broken into pieces and eaten like hardtack. What was the staple of the medieval diet? Cod again, sold salted by the Basques, an enigmatic people with a mysterious, unlimited supply of cod. As we make our way through the centuries of cod history, we also find a delicious legacy of recipes, and the tragic story of environmental failure, of depleted fishing stocks where once their numbers were legendary. In this lovely, thoughtful history, Mark Kurlansky ponders the question: Is the fish that changed the world forever changed by the world's folly?

“Every once in a while a writer of particular skill takes a fresh, seemingly improbable idea and turns out a book of pure delight. Such is the case of Mark Kurlansky and the codfish.” –David McCullough, author of The Wright Brothers and 1776

 

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LibraryThing Review

Umsögn notanda  - driscoll42 - LibraryThing

A microhistory on the history of Cod, which is not something I ever expected to care about, but this book was an enjoyable trek through history, how crucial it was to human exploration of North ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

Umsögn notanda  - jonerthon - LibraryThing

This is an older title, but I didn't have a good grasp on the details of cod-heavy fishing communities in New England and wanted to know more. This delivered. On a first blush I would have thought the ... Read full review

Efni

Sentry on the Headlands So Close to Ireland
1
The Race to Codlandia
17
With Mouth Wide Open
32
The Cold Rush
48
1620 The Rock and the Cod
62
Certain Inalienable Rignts
78
A Cod War Heard Round the World
92
A Few New Ideas Versus Nine Million Eggs
111
Iceland Discovers the Finite Universe
144
Three Wars to Close the Open Sea
158
Requiem for the Grand Banks
177
The Dangerous Waters of Natures Resilience
191
Bracing for the Spanish Armada
207
Bracing for the Canadian Armadu
219
SIX CENTURIES OF COD RECIPIES
235
Höfundarréttur

The Last Two Ideas
127

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Um höfundinn (1998)

Mark Kurlansky is the New York Times bestselling author of Cod, Salt, Paper, The Basque History of the World, 1968, The Big Oyster, International Night, The Eastern Stars, A Continent of Islands, and The White Man in the Tree and Other Stories. He received the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Nonviolence, Bon Appetit's Food Writer of the Year Award, the James Beard Award, and the Glenfiddich Award. Salt was a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist. He spent ten years as Caribbean correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. He lives in New York City. www.markkurlansky.com.

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