Testaments Betrayed

Framhli­ kßpu
Faber & Faber, 1996 - 280 sÝ­ur
In the light of their wisdom this book examines some of the great situations of our time. The moral trial of the 20th century's art, from Celine to Mayakovsky; the passage of time which blurs the boundaries between the 'I' of the present day and the 'I' of the past; modesty as an essential concept in an age based on the individual and indiscretion which, as it becomes the habit and the norm, heralds the twilight of individualism; the testaments, the betrayed testaments - of Europe, of art, of the art of the novel and of artists.

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LibraryThing Review

Ums÷gn notanda  - rickstill122 - LibraryThing

Yes, with this book and Kundera's other essay collections "The Curtain" and "The Art of the Novel", one could absorb a knowledge of world literature- what it is, where it came from, where it is going ... Read full review

TESTAMENTS BETRAYED: An Essay in Nine Parts

Ums÷gn notanda  - Kirkus

Like a literary knight errant, Czech novelist Kundera (The Unbearable Lightness of Being, 1984; Immortality, 1991; etc.) rescues the novel, admired novelists, and composers from the distortions and ... Read full review

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Um h÷fundinn (1996)

Milan Kundera, born in Brno, Czechoslovakia, was a student when the Czech Communist regime was established in 1948, and later worked as a labourer, jazz musician and professor at the Institute for Advanced Cinematographic Studies in Prague. After the Russian invasion in August 1968, his books were proscribed. In 1975, he and his wife settled in France, and in 1981, he became a French citizen. He is the author of the novels The Joke, Life is Elsewhere, Farewell Waltz, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting, The Unbearable Lightness of Being, and Immortality, and of the short-story collection Laughable Loves - all originally in Czech. His most recent novels, Slowness, Identity and Ignorance, as well as his non-fiction works The Art of the Novel and Testaments Betrayed, were originally written in French.

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