The Unwomanly Face of War: An Oral History of Women in World War II

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Random House Publishing Group, 25. júl. 2017 - 384 síđur
A long-awaited English translation of the groundbreaking oral history of women in World War II across Europe and Russia—from the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The Washington Post • The Guardian • NPR • The Economist • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel • Kirkus Reviews

For more than three decades, Svetlana Alexievich has been the memory and conscience of the twentieth century. When the Swedish Academy awarded her the Nobel Prize, it cited her invention of “a new kind of literary genre,” describing her work as “a history of emotions . . . a history of the soul.”

In The Unwomanly Face of War, Alexievich chronicles the experiences of the Soviet women who fought on the front lines, on the home front, and in the occupied territories. These women—more than a million in total—were nurses and doctors, pilots, tank drivers, machine-gunners, and snipers. They battled alongside men, and yet, after the victory, their efforts and sacrifices were forgotten.

Alexievich traveled thousands of miles and visited more than a hundred towns to record these women’s stories. Together, this symphony of voices reveals a different aspect of the war—the everyday details of life in combat left out of the official histories.

Translated by the renowned Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, The Unwomanly Face of War is a powerful and poignant account of the central conflict of the twentieth century, a kaleidoscopic portrait of the human side of war.

THE WINNER OF THE NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE
“for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.” 

“A landmark.”—Timothy Snyder, author of On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century

“An astonishing book, harrowing and life-affirming . . . It deserves the widest possible readership.”—Paula Hawkins, author of The Girl on the Train

“Alexievich has gained probably the world’s deepest, most eloquent understanding of the post-Soviet condition. . . . [She] has consistently chronicled that which has been intentionally forgotten.”—Masha Gessen, National Book Award–winning author of The Future Is History
 

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LibraryThing Review

Umsögn notanda  - questbird - LibraryThing

A whole lot of war stories from the points of view of some of the million frontline female Soviet World War 2 veterans. Many of the stories brought tears to my eyes. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

Umsögn notanda  - LyndaInOregon - LibraryThing

The book I read was the edition entitled "The Unwomanly Face of War". I can find it in the database but can't get it to enter here. I'm assuming it's the same book in a different edition. This was an ... Read full review

Efni

GROW UP GIRLS YOURE STILL GREEN
19
ALONE CAME BACK TO MAMA
71
TWO WARS LIVE IN Our HOUSE
91
THEY AWARDED US LITTLE MEDALS
113
IT WASNT ME
131
I REMEMBER THOSE EYES EVEN NOW
141
we DiDNT SHOOT
159
THEY NEEDED SOLDIERS BUT WE ALSO
185
YOUNG LADIESI DO YOU KNOW THE COMMANDER
211
TO SEE HIM JUST ONCE
225
ABOUT TINY POTATOES
251
Höfundarréttur

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Um höfundinn (2017)

Svetlana Alexievich was born in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine, in 1948 and has spent most of her life in the Soviet Union and present-day Belarus, with prolonged periods of exile in Western Europe. Starting out as a journalist, she developed her own nonfiction genre, which gathers a chorus of voices to describe a specific historical moment. Her works include The Unwomanly Face of War (1985), Last Witnesses (1985), Zinky Boys (1990), Voices from Chernobyl (1997), and Secondhand Time (2013). She has won many international awards, including the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature “for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.”

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